Four Letter Words
Palabras de cuatro letras

  • English
  • Español

Four Letter Words

Story by Mónica Barnkow and Debralee Santos

Photos by Mónica Barnkow

“This would have been an unforgettable day,” said Aracely Cruz, here with her daughters.

“This would have been an unforgettable day,” said Aracely Cruz, here with her daughters.

Aracely Cruz’s dream is to be ordinary.

“This would have been an unforgettable day,” said Cruz recently.

The 30-year-old moved to the United States as a minor at the age of 14.

Cruz is one of about 11 million undocumented immigrants eligible to take part in President Barack Obama’s Executive Action programs – the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA) and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).

As announced by President Obama in November, eligibility for the latter was extended to allow for an estimated additional 300,000 individuals; together, the programs would grant work authorization and a temporary, renewable suspension of deportation for millions.

President Barack Obama declared the executive actions in November 2014.

President Barack Obama declared the executive actions in November 2014.

But because the executive orders, originally set to be enacted on May 19th, are being contested in court, the application process is now on hold.

A lawsuit has been brought by 26 states who claim that the actions constitute an overreach of executive power that would place undue burdens on state budgets.

This prompted a temporary federal injunction.

Applications for the extended DACA that would have made their way to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) in February are now stalled, as are DAPA applications would have begun to be received on May 19th.

For Cruz, who is also the mother of two American daughters, submitting her paperwork would have been the first step in a process towards “normal”.

The forum was held at 32BJ’s offices.

The forum was held at 32BJ’s offices.

“I would have been one more New Yorker,” she says.

Despite the present state of limbo, Cruz said she was hopeful that the delay was only that.

“Sí, se puede,” she exhorted, standing before a crowd gathered at the Manhattan offices of SEIU 32BJ for a town hall forum organized by the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs (MOIA) and advocacy groups to provide updates on immigration relief efforts.

Advocates present were united in their belief that the executive action orders would soon go into effect. The dismissal of the legal claims, they believe, was just a matter of time.

Maribel Hernández Rivera is the Executive Director for Executive Action at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs.

Maribel Hernández Rivera is the Executive Director for Executive Action at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs.

Moreover, they encouraged eligible applicants to use the extra time wisely to prepare, to enlist the services of a legally authorized immigration services provider, to review application guidelines, and to gather all necessary paperwork and filing costs in anticipation of enactment.

“We should be getting all the documents we need,” urged Maribel Hernández Rivera, Executive Director for Executive Action at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, who also announced the recent release of a guide to help applicants prepare.

Betsy Plum, Director of Special Projects at the New York Immigration Coalition (NYIC), agreed it was a very useful tool for applicants.

“The guide is a really good resource,” she said.

Allan Wernick, Director of the CUNY Citizenship Now! program, provided a legal update.

Allan Wernick, Director of the CUNY Citizenship Now! program, provided a legal update.

Allan Wernick, Director of the CUNY Citizenship Now! program, provided an update on the orders’ current status.

In mid-April, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals heard the federal government’s emergency appeal of the temporary injunction; the president’s lawyers argued that no direct harm would come to the states should the executive actions be effected, and asked for the injunction to lifted while the case proceeds.

The three-judge panel is set to reconvene later this month.

Wernick, who recently oversaw the 7th Annual CUNY Citizenship Now Call-In telephone drive, which assisted over 7,000 residents, stressed the importance and influence of activism.

“We can influence what our courts do by our social actions and activity,” he observed. “There is a relationship between social action and judicial activity.”

Nisha Agarwal, Commissioner of Immigrant Affairs (MOIA) said the city stood behind the President’s efforts.

“NYC is 100 percent committed to defending the President’s executive action on immigration,” said the Commissioner. “It is needed.”

"[This] is just the first step to immigration reform," said Immigrant Affairs Commissioner Nisha Agarwal.

“[This] is just the first step to immigration reform,” said Immigrant Affairs Commissioner Nisha Agarwal.

In mid-April, MOIA organized one of the largest free legal screenings in the city, in which over 600 people met with experienced volunteers for advice and information on legal options.

“[This] is just the first step to immigration reform,” added Agarwal.

She said MOIA would continue its outreach efforts to ensure that residents were informed and engaged on next steps.

It is estimated that, in New York State alone, 338,000 undocumented immigrants may qualify under DAPA and DACA.

Koku Afeto may be one.

Afeto recited the Pledge of Allegiance every day as a child attending school.

He moved to the United States in 1991 at the age of 12.

“I grew up as an American,” said Afeto, the son of a diplomat from Togo who is eligible for DACA. He is now a member African Communities Together, a civil rights organization of African immigrants.

But his undocumented – and unsettled – legal status has prevented him from living a normal life, he says.

He wants to move forward, and make the patriotic words he knows by heart mean something more.

“I just want to have a fair share of the pie,” he said.

Getting ready.

Getting ready.

In the dark on DACA and DAPA?

(As adapted from Crosstreets, Catholic Charities of New York’s blog at http://bit.ly/1FcQBr0)

An estimated 338,000 undocumented immigrants living in New York State may qualify for President Obama’s Executive Action on immigration reform.

That might mean you – and/or someone you know..

Q: How Can They Help?

A: The President’s Executive Action is still being fought in the courts.  If it goes through, these four letters – DACA or DAPA – could change your life.

  • Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA)
    DAPA helps parents who arrived in the United States on or before January 1, 2010, and who have at least one U.S. Citizen or Legal Permanent Resident son or daughter. This allows immigrant parents to stay in the country, work legally for 3 years, and apply for travel permission.
  • Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)
    DACA helps immigrants who came to the United States before their 16th birthday and arrived on or before January 1, 2010. This program allows immigrants who qualify to stay in the country, work legally for 3 years, and apply for travel permission.

Q: Why are these programs important?

A: The U.S. government will not deport immigrants who qualify for either of these programs for 3 years. This promise is called “Deferred Action” and will be written on a Work Authorization card with your name and picture. Even though these programs are temporary, if you believe you qualify, continue to gather documents and evidence for your application.

Need more assistance?

Workshops and presentations are offered by the Office of Immigrant Affairs; CUNY’s Citizenship Now!; New York Immigration Coalition; Catholic Charities and others.

For more information, please visit the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs at http://tinyurl.com/y3zjdk5 or call the free New York State New Americans Hotline at 800.566.7636.

Palabras de cuatro letras

Historia por Mónica Barnkow y Debralee Santos

Fotos por Mónica Barnkow

The forum was held at 32BJ’s offices.

El foro se celebró en las oficinas de SEIU 32BJ.

El sueño de Aracely Cruz es ser normal.

“Éste habría sido un día inolvidable”, dijo Cruz recientemente.

La mujer de 30 años de edad se mudó a los Estados Unidos siendo una menor, a los 14 años.

Cruz es una de los aproximadamente 11 millones de inmigrantes indocumentados elegibles para participar en los programas de acción ejecutiva del presidente Barack Obama, la Acción Diferida para la Responsabilidad de los Padres (DAPA por sus siglas en inglés) y la Acción Diferida para los Llegados en la Infancia (DACA por sus siglas en inglés).

Betsy Plum is the Director of Special Projects at the New York Immigration Coalition (NYIC).

Betsy Plum es la directora de Proyectos Especiales de la Coalición de Inmigración de Nueva York (NYIC por sus siglas en inglés).

Según lo anunciado por el presidente Obama en noviembre, la elegibilidad para este último se amplió para permitir un estimado de 300,000 personas adicionales. En conjunto, los programas  concederán autorización para trabajar y una suspensión temporal renovable de deportación a millones.

Pero debido a que las órdenes ejecutivas, establecidas originalmente para ser promulgadas el 19 de mayo, están siendo impugnadas en los tribunales, el proceso de solicitud está ahora en espera.

Una demanda ha sido interpuesta por 26 estados que afirman que las acciones constituyen una extralimitación del poder ejecutivo, y que colocaría cargas indebidas en los presupuestos estatales.

Esto llevó a un amparo federal temporal.

Las solicitudes para DACA ampliada que han hecho su camino a la Oficina de Ciudadanía y Servicios de Inmigración (USCIS por sus siglas en inglés) en febrero están estancadas, como están las aplicaciones DAPA, que hubieran comenzado a ser recibidas el 19 de mayo.

Para Cruz, quien también es madre de dos hijas estadounidenses, presentar su documentación habría sido el primer paso en un proceso hacia la “normalidad”.

“This would have been an unforgettable day,” said Aracely Cruz, here with her daughters.

“Éste habría sido un día inolvidable”, dijo Aracely Cruz, aquí con sus hijas.

“Sería una neoyorquina más”, dijo.

A pesar del actual estado de limbo, Cruz dice tener esperanzas de que el retraso sea sólo eso.

“Sí se puede”, exhortó de pie ante una multitud reunida en las oficinas de Manhattan de SEIU 32BJ, para un foro del ayuntamiento organizado por la Oficina de Asuntos de Inmigración y grupos de defensa de la Alcaldía para proporcionar información actualizada sobre los esfuerzos de ayuda sobre inmigración.

Los defensores presentes estaban unidos en su creencia de que las órdenes de acción ejecutiva pronto entrarán en vigor. El cese de los reclamos legales, en su opinión, es sólo cuestión de tiempo.

Por otra parte, recomiendan a los solicitantes elegibles utilizar sabiamente el tiempo extra para prepararse, enlistar los servicios de proveedores autorizados de servicios legales de inmigración, revisar las directrices de la solicitud, reunir todos los papeles necesarios y cubrir los costos, anticipándose a su promulgación.

Maribel Hernández Rivera is the Executive Director for Executive Action at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs.

Maribel Hernández Rivera es la directora ejecutiva de Acción Ejecutiva de la oficina de Asuntos de Inmigración del Alcalde.

“Deberíamos tener todos los documentos que necesitamos”, instó Maribel Hernández Rivera, directora ejecutiva de Acción Ejecutiva de la oficina de Asuntos de Inmigración del Alcalde, quien también anunció la reciente publicación de una guía para ayudar a los solicitantes a prepararse.

Betsy Plum, directora de Proyectos Especiales de la Coalición de Inmigración de Nueva York (NYIC por sus siglas en inglés), convino en que es una herramienta muy útil para los solicitantes.

“La guía es un muy buen recurso”, dijo.

Allan Wernick, director del programa de CUNY Citizenship Now!, presentó una actualización sobre el estado actual de las órdenes.

A mediados de abril, el Quinto Tribunal de Circuito de Apelaciones escuchó la apelación de emergencia del gobierno federal de la medida cautelar; los abogados del Presidente argumentaron que ningún daño directo se haría a los estados de efectuarse las acciones ejecutivas, y pidieron que el mandato fuese levantado mientras el caso procede.

Allan Wernick, Director of the CUNY Citizenship Now! program, provided a legal update.

Allan Wernick, el director del programa de CUNY Citizenship Now!, ofreció un análisis legal.

El panel de tres jueces será convocado nuevamente a finales de este mes.

Wernick, quien recientemente supervisó la séptima campaña telefónica anual CUNY Citizenship Now que ayudó a más de 7,000 residentes, destacó la importancia y la influencia del activismo.

“Podemos influir en lo que nuestros tribunales hacen a través de nuestras acciones sociales y actividades”, observó. “Existe una relación entre la acción social y la actividad judicial”.

Nisha Agarwal, comisionada de Asuntos Migratorios (MOIA por sus siglas en inglés), dijo que la ciudad apoya los esfuerzos del Presidente.

“La ciudad de Nueva York está 100 por ciento comprometida con la defensa de la acción ejecutiva del Presidente sobre la inmigración”, dijo la comisionada. “Es necesaria”.

A mediados de abril, MOIA organizó una de las más grandes evaluaciones legales gratuitas en la ciudad, en la que más de 600 personas se reunieron con voluntarios experimentados para obtener asesoría e información sobre opciones legales.

“[Esto] es sólo el primer paso para una reforma migratoria”, agregó Agarwal.

MOIA dijo que continuará sus esfuerzos de difusión para asegurar que los residentes estén informados y participen en los próximos pasos.

“I grew up as an American,” says Koku Afeto.

“Crecí como estadounidense”, dijo Koku Afeto.

Se estima que, en el estado de Nueva York solamente, 338,000 inmigrantes indocumentados puedan calificar bajo DAPA y DACA.

Koku Afeto puede ser uno.

Afeto recitó el juramento a la bandera todos los días siendo niño mientras asistía a la escuela.

Se mudó a los Estados Unidos en 1991, a los 12 años de edad.

“Crecí como estadounidense”, dijo Afeto, hijo de un diplomático de Togo que es elegible para DACA.

Pero su estatus legal indocumentado -y sin resolver- le ha impedido llevar una vida normal, dice.

Él quiere seguir adelante y hacer que las palabras patrióticas que conoce de memoria signifiquen algo más.

“Yo sólo quiero tener una participación equitativa en el pastel”, dijo.

¿En la oscuridad sobre DACA y DAPA?

(Adaptado de Crosstreets, blog de Caridades Católicas de Nueva York en http://bit.ly/1FcQBr0)

Se calcula que 338,000 inmigrantes indocumentados que viven en el estado de Nueva York pueden calificar para la Acción Ejecutiva del Presidente Obama sobre la reforma migratoria.

Eso podría significar usted, y/o alguien que usted conoce.

P: ¿Cómo pueden ayudar?

R: La acción ejecutiva del Presidente todavía se está peleando en los tribunales. Si sigue adelante, estas cuatro letras -DACA o DAPA- podrían cambiar su vida.

  • Acción Diferida para Responsabilidad de los Padres (DAPA)
    DAPA ayuda a los padres que llegaron a los Estados Unidos el o antes del 1 de enero de 2010, y quienes tienen al menos un hijo ciudadano estadounidense o con residencia permanente legal. Esto permite a los padres migrantes permanecer en el país, trabajar legalmente por tres años y solicitar permiso de viaje.
  • Acción Diferida para los Llegados en la Infancia (DACA)
    DACA ayuda a los inmigrantes que llegaron a los Estados Unidos antes de su cumpleaños 16 en, o antes, del 1 de enero de 2010. Este programa ayuda a los inmigrantes que califican para quedarse en el país, trabajar legalmente por tres años y solicitar un permiso de viaje.
Getting ready.

Preparandose

P: ¿Por qué son importantes estos programas?

R: El gobierno de Estados Unidos no va a deportar a los inmigrantes que califiquen para cualquiera de estos programas durante 3 años. Esta promesa se llama “Acción Diferida” y se escribirá en una tarjeta de Autorización de Trabajo con su nombre y foto. A pesar de que estos programas son temporales, si usted cree que califica, siga recopilando documentos y pruebas para su solicitud.

¿Necesita más ayuda?

Talleres y presentaciones son ofrecidos por la Oficina de Asuntos de Inmigración, Citizenship Now! de CUNY, la Coalición de Inmigración de Nueva York, Caridades Católicas y otros.

Para obtener más información, visite la Oficina de Asuntos de Inmigración de la Alcaldía enhttp://tinyurl.com/y3zjdk5 o llame a la línea gratuita de nuevos estadounidenses del estado de Nueva York al 800.566.7636.