Filling in the void
Llenar el vacío

  • English
  • Español

Filling in the void

Story by Gregg McQueen

Photos: Heart Gallery/NYC Department of Homeless Services

"Homeless people view things differently," says photographer German Rosa, here receiving his camera. Photo: Stephanie Warren

“Homeless people view things differently,” says photographer German Rosa, here receiving his camera.
Photo: Stephanie Warren

German Rosa has always been interested in photography, and he longed to take pictures of New York City.
However, he didn’t own a camera.

He’d also spent many years without a permanent roof over his head.

Rosa said he has been without stable housing since 2000, sleeping in subways, parks, shelters, even an empty synagogue. He suggested that dispossessed New Yorkers share a unique perspective of the city.
“Homeless people view things differently,” said Rosa. “Most people look at a park bench and see a relaxing place where they can look at birds, but a homeless person sees it as a bed.”

This year, Rosa received an opportunity to learn about photography and document the city through his distinct vantage point — he is a participant in “Through the Eyes of the Homeless,” a project that showcases photographs taken by homeless individuals.

Mentor photographer Aliya Naumoff (center) with participants. Photo: Yury Primakov

Mentor photographer Aliya Naumoff (center) with participants.
Photo: Yury Primakov

The project, sponsored by Heart Gallery NYC in partnership with the city’s Department of Homeless Services (DHS), paired 14 homeless individuals with professional photographers who served as mentors. Participants were given use of a camera to capture images of city life and landscapes.

“It was really about empowering the homeless participants,” said Heart Gallery NYC’s Executive Director Laurie Sherman Graff. “They were able to display hidden talents and develop confidence and meaningful bonds with their mentors.”

Heart Gallery NYC is best known for its annual exhibit featuring photos of children in the city’s foster care system, to help connect them with permanent homes.

“Through the Eyes of the Homeless” was inspired by a similar undertaking in Paris by the French nonprofit Deuxieme Marche, said Graff, which proved successful in linking previously homeless individuals with permanent housing.

One of the images from the new exhibit.

One of the images from the new exhibit.

Graff said she hopes the New York project can dispel common myths about homelessness and show the public that individuals who lack housing need not be feared.

“The homeless are not always drug addicts and criminals,” remarked Graff. “There are many things that can go wrong in someone’s life to put them in that position. They could be any one of us.”

For Rosa, the program was transformative.

“It made me feel important,” he stated.

“Most people don’t want to know that the homeless exist,” added Rosa. “We’re pushed to the side.”
Participants began meeting with their photographer mentors in July over a series of luncheons, where they were shown how to work a digital camera.

“Some wanted to photograph where they slept on the street, to show what New York City looks like to them,” Graff explained. “We told them to take pictures of whatever they felt like.”
Rosa was paired with mentor photographer Aliya Naumoff, who has worked on Heart Gallery’s foster child project for the past eight years.

Naumoff gave camera tips to Rosa as the two walked around the city scoping out scenes to photograph. Participants were allowed borrow cameras for a full week in the summer to take pictures on their own before reporting back to their mentors.

Rosa captured images of statues, skyscrapers, parks and a rooster he witnessed strutting around.
“German took some really nice photos, including some beautiful shots at night,” Naumoff said. “He seems to have a talent for finding something unusual in everyday life.”

While Naumoff has frequently worked as a photographer of celebrities and rock stars, she has also documented the plight of Syrian refugees. Aiding displaced individuals is something that Naumoff is drawn to, inspired by her own mother, who spent time in a refugee camp in Germany.

“[Participants] were able to display hidden talents," says Heart Gallery NYC's Laurie Sherman Graff.

“[Participants] were able to display hidden talents,” says Heart Gallery NYC’s Laurie Sherman Graff.

“I was brought up in a way that made me think people are supposed to help others,” Naumoff said.
For her sessions with Rosa, Naumoff encouraged her mentee to explore his natural talents.

“Homeless individuals are not used to people giving them a chance,” Naumoff remarked. “Sometimes all they need is a friend and someone to believe in them.”

Two photos from each of the 14 homeless participants were selected for display at DHS headquarters in Lower Manhattan. The collection can be viewed there until November 23, and will be shown at various sites around the five boroughs over the next year.

A reception was held at the Prince George Ballroom. Photo: Kim Parker Maneja

A reception was held at the Prince George Ballroom.
Photo: Kim Parker Maneja

Prints of the photos will be sold by Heart Gallery NYC, with money going directly to the homeless individuals, according to Graff.

“We’re hoping to do this project on an annual basis, and open it up to even more people,” Graff said.
On November 16, a reception was held at the Prince George Ballroom to celebrate “Through the Eyes of the Homeless.” Makeup artists and hairstylists were on hand to create new looks for mentees in their debut as emerging photographers.

“We wanted to have a ‘red carpet’ atmosphere and really make the participants feel special,” Graff said.
At the conclusion of the event, all participants were given the gift of a brand new camera, to continue practicing their photography.

Inspired by the project, Rosa has been trying to set his life on a better path.

"We told them to take pictures of whatever they felt like,” said Graff.

“We told them to take pictures of whatever they felt like,” said Graff.

Through aid from BRC, a homeless outreach organization, Rosa is currently staying at an assistive residence in the Bronx while he awaits permanent housing. He has been taking work as a day laborer and carpenter.

It’s Rosa’s hope that the photography project will give voice to the city’s homeless population.
“We’re actually showing people New York City the way we see it,” Rosa said. “If someone sees one of my pictures, hopefully it will connect with them too.”

Photos from the “Through the Eyes of the Homeless” project will be displayed from November 17 to 23 in the lobby of NYC Department of Homeless Services, 33 Beaver Street, New York, NY.
For more on the project and to see a collection of images, visit www.eyesofthehomelessnyc.org.

Llenar el vacío

Historia por Gregg McQueen

Fotos por La Galería Heart NYC y el Departamento de Servicios para las Personas sin Hogar de la ciudad

Una imagen de la exhibición.

Una imagen de la exhibición.

Germán Rosa siempre ha estado interesado en la fotografía. Él deseaba tomar fotos de la ciudad de Nueva York, sin embargo, no poseía una cámara.

También pasó muchos años sin un techo permanente sobre la cabeza.

Rosa dijo que ha estado sin vivienda estable desde el año 2000, y ha dormido en el tren, parques, albergues e incluso en una sinagoga vacía. Sugirió que los desposeídos neoyorquinos comparten una perspectiva única de la ciudad.

"We told them to take pictures of whatever they felt like,” said Graff.

“Les dijimos que tomaran fotos de lo que quisieran”, dijo Graff.

“Las personas sin hogar ven las cosas de manera diferente”, explicó. “La gente encuentra una banca en el parque y ve un lugar relajante donde contemplar las aves, pero una persona sin hogar la ve como una cama”.

Este año, Rosa recibió la oportunidad de aprender sobre fotografía y documentar la ciudad desde su particular punto de vista. Es un participante en “A través de los ojos de las personas sin hogar”, un proyecto que muestra fotografías tomadas por las personas sin hogar.

El proyecto, patrocinado por la Galería Heart NYC en colaboración con el Departamento de Servicios para las Personas sin Hogar de la ciudad (DHS por sus siglas en inglés), emparejó a 14 individuos sin hogar con fotógrafos profesionales que sirvieron como mentores. A los participantes se les prestó una cámara para capturar imágenes de la vida de la ciudad y sus paisajes.

A reception was held at the Prince George Ballroom. Photo: Kim Parker Maneja

Una recepción se celebró en el Salón Prince George.
Foto: Kim Parker Maneja

“Realmente se trató de empoderar a los participantes sin hogar”, dijo la directora ejecutiva de la Galería Heart NYC, Laurie Sherman Graff. “Pudieron mostrar sus talentos ocultos y desarrollar confianza y lazos significativos con sus mentores”.

La Galería Heart NYC es conocida por su exhibición anual de fotos que presenta a niños del sistema de cuidado adoptivo de la ciudad para ayudar a conectarlos con viviendas permanentes.

“A través de los ojos de las personas sin hogar” se inspiró en una empresa similar en París de la organización francesa sin fines de lucro Deuxieme Marche, dijo Graff, que tuvo éxito vinculando a las personas previamente sin hogar con viviendas permanentes.

Graff dijo que espera que el proyecto de Nueva York ayude a disipar mitos comunes acerca de la falta de vivienda y que muestre al público que las personas que carecen de vivienda no tienen por qué ser temidas.

“[Participants] were able to display hidden talents," says Heart Gallery NYC's Laurie Sherman Graff.

“Pudieron mostrar sus talentos ocultos”, dijo Laurie Sherman Graff de la Galería Heart NYC.

“Las personas sin hogar no siempre son adictas a las drogas ni delincuentes”, comentó. “Hay muchas cosas que pueden salir mal en la vida de alguien para ponerla en esa posición. Ellos podrían ser cualquiera de nosotros”.

Para Rosa, el programa fue transformador.

“Me hizo sentir importante”, declaró.

“La mayoría de la gente no quiere saber que existen las personas sin hogar”, añadió. “Nos echan a un lado”.

Los participantes empezaron reuniéndose con sus mentores fotógrafos en julio durante una serie de almuerzos, en los cuales se les mostró cómo trabajar con una cámara digital.

“Algunos querían fotografiar donde dormían en la calle para mostrar cómo ven a la ciudad de Nueva York”, explicó Graff. “Les dijimos que tomaran fotos de lo que quisieran”.

A Rosa se le emparejó con la fotógrafa mentora Aliya Naumoff, quien ha trabajado en los proyectos de niños adoptivos de la Galería Heart durante los últimos ocho años.

Naumoff le dio consejos sobre las cámaras a Rosa mientras caminaban alrededor de la ciudad determinando el alcance de las escenas para fotografiar. A los participantes se les prestaron cámaras por una semana completa durante el verano para que tomaran fotografías ellos solos antes de reportarse con sus mentores.

"We're actually showing people New York City the way we see it," says Rosa.

“De hecho estamos mostrando la ciudad de Nueva York la forma en la que vemos [nosotros]”, dijo Rosa.

Rosa capturó imágenes de estatuas, rascacielos, parques y un gallo al que vio pavoneándose.

“German tomó algunas fotos muy bonitas, incluyendo unas hermosas en la noche”, dijo Naumoff. “Parece que tiene un talento para encontrar algo inusual en la vida cotidiana”.

Si bien Naumoff ha trabajado frecuentemente como fotógrafa de celebridades y estrellas de rock, también ha documentado la situación de los refugiados sirios. Ayudar a las personas desplazadas es algo a lo que Naumoff se siente atraída, inspirada por su propia madre, quien pasó un tiempo en un campo de refugiados en Alemania.

“Fui criada en una forma que me hizo pensar que las personas deben ayudarse unas a otras”, dijo.

Para sus sesiones con Rosa, Naumoff animó a su pupilo a explorar sus talentos naturales.

“Las personas sin hogar no están acostumbradas a que la gente les dé una oportunidad”, comentó Naumoff. “A veces, todo lo que necesitan es un amigo y alguien que crea en ellos”.

Dos fotos de cada uno de los 14 participantes sin hogar fueron seleccionadas para la exhibición en la sede del DHS en el Bajo Manhattan. La colección se puede ver hasta el 23 de noviembre y se exhibirá en varios sitios de los cinco condados durante el próximo año.

Mentor photographer Aliya Naumoff (center) with participants. Photo: Yury Primakov

La fotógrafa mentora Aliya Naumoff Aliya Naumoff (centro) con participantes.
Foto: Yury Primakov
Photo: Yury Primakov

Las impresiones de las fotos serán vendidas por la Galería Heart NYC, y el dinero irá directamente a las personas sin hogar, según Graff.

“Tenemos la esperanza de hacer este proyecto una vez al año y abrirlo a más gente”, explicó.

El 16 de noviembre tuvo lugar una recepción en el Salón Prince George para celebrar “A través de los ojos de las personas sin hogar”. Estuvieron disponibles maquilladores y estilistas para crear nuevos looks para los pupilos en su debut como fotógrafos emergentes.

“Queríamos tener un ambiente de ‘alfombra roja’ y realmente hacer que los participantes se sintieran especiales”, dijo Graff.

"Homeless people view things differently," says photographer German Rosa, here receiving his camera. Photo: Stephanie Warren

“Las personas sin hogar ven las cosas de manera diferente”, explicó el fotógrafo German Rosa, aquí recibiendo su camara.
Foto: Stephanie Warren

Al término del evento, todos los participantes recibieron como regalo una nueva cámara para seguir practicando su fotografía.

Inspirado por el proyecto, Rosa ha tratado de establecer su vida en un mejor camino.

A través de la ayuda de BRC, una organización para las personas sin hogar, Rosa está actualmente alojado en una residencia asistida en el Bronx mientras espera una vivienda permanente. Él ha estado tomando trabajos como jornalero y carpintero.

Es la esperanza de Rosa que el proyecto de fotografía dé voz a personas sin hogar de la ciudad.
“De hecho estamos mostrando a la gente de la ciudad de Nueva York la forma en la que vemos a la ciudad”, dijo Rosa. “Si alguien ve una de mis fotos, espero conectar con esa persona también”.

Las fotografías del proyecto “A través de los ojos de las personas sin hogar” se exhibirán del 17 al 23 de noviembre en el vestíbulo del Departamento de Servicios para las Personas sin Hogar de NYC, ubicado en el No. 33 de la calle Beaver, Nueva York, NY.

Para más información sobre el proyecto y ver una colección de imágenes, visite www.eyesofthehomelessnyc.org.

Photos from the “Through the Eyes of the Homeless” project will be displayed from November 17 to 23 in the lobby of NYC Department of Homeless Services, 33 Beaver Street, New York, NY.
For more on the project and to see a collection of images, visit www.eyesofthehomelessnyc.org.