Call for oversight of commercial bail bond industry
Fin a las fianzas injustas

  • English
  • Español

Call for oversight of commercial bail bond industry

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen

The group gathered at City Hall.

The group gathered at City Hall.

Bear down on the bail bond companies.

Advocates are making a push to ensure that New Yorkers caught up in the criminal justice system are not getting fleeced by commercial bail bond companies.

“Roughly 45,000 presumptively innocent New Yorkers will be jailed this year for their inability to afford bail,” said Peter Goldberg, Executive Director of the Brooklyn Community Bail Fund, an organization that pays bail for over 1,500 low-income individuals annually in Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Staten Island.

“Every day we see the harmful effects and the commercial actors who profit from it, as people turn to bail bond companies unless they want to fight their case from a jail cell,” Goldberg said.

At a City Hall press conference on June 14, the Brooklyn Community Bail Fund released a new report that details commercial bail bond companies in New York City operating in violation of state laws and regulations. It also highlights the apparent lack of oversight in the industry, which advocates said leads many bail bond outfits to take advantage of consumers whose loved ones are facing jail time.

The report focuses on commercial bail bond companies.

The report focuses on commercial bail bond companies.

“Every year, this privatized, for-profit industry gets rich by exploiting consumers when they’re at their most vulnerable,” said Nick Malinowski, Civil Rights Campaign Director at VOCAL-NY, one of the advocacy groups who helped announce the report.

“Predatory bail lending targets low-income communities of color,” said Supervising Attorney Nasoan Sheftel-Gomes.

“Predatory bail lending targets low-income communities of color,” said Supervising Attorney Nasoan Sheftel-Gomes.

“Nobody has done an industry-wide audit or could even tell us who the biggest players in the industry are,” he said.

According to the report, many bondsmen operate without state licenses, and also fail to comply with state-required reporting obligations.

“There’s a complete lack of transparency,” Goldberg said. “The name of a bond company outside their store will be different than the name of their company if you call them.”

“The illegal, deceptive practices of bondsmen, coupled with the lack of periodic audits by any state agency means we really don’t even know which companies are operating right now it New York City,” he added.

The advocates called city upon state and city regulators — specifically Governor Andrew Cuomo, Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, the New York State Department of Financial Services (DFS) and the city’s Department of Consumer Affairs (DCA) — to create oversight and enhance regulation of the commercial bail bond industry.

“This is an industry that by its very nature is predatory and harmful,” remarked Goldberg.

Nasoan Sheftel-Gomes, Supervising Attorney at the Community Development Project at Urban Justice Center, said that bail industry practices represent “classic consumer fraud operating within the criminal justice system.”

She said that many bail bond companies charge illegal fees, fail to return collateral, and create purposeful delays in bailing people out of jail.

“Predatory bail lending targets low-income communities of color and drains these communities of money needed,” Sheftel-Gomes said. “New Yorkers who are paying for bondsmen are doing so instead of paying rent or utilities.”

Malinowski said that advocacy groups have met with city and state regulators over the past two years to explain the issues facing the industry.

“We’ve seen more conversations about how cash bail and commercial bail bonds negatively impact people, but we haven’t seen any momentum in terms of people stepping up to do something about it,” he remarked.

“Cash bail punishes and imprisons people simply because they’re poor,” said Peter Goldberg.

“Cash bail punishes and imprisons people simply because they’re poor,” said Peter Goldberg.

“We know that meaningful oversight works, because we’ve seen it succeed in other industries,” said Sheftel-Gomes, noting that that debt collection businesses, once slammed for dishonest practices, were reined in by efforts from by DFS, the Attorney General and DCA.

Advocates also commented that the practice of cash bail also needs to be eliminated, as it unfairly punishes poor New Yorkers.

“If you want to close Rikers, you have to get rid of cash bail,” stated Goldberg.

“Cash bail punishes and imprisons people simply because they’re poor,” he said. “Nearly 80 percent of the folks on Rikers are presumptively innocent, and they’re sitting there simply because they can’t afford to buy their own freedom.”

Janos Marton, Director of Policy for Just Leadership USA, said the city should support regulation of the bail bond industry based on the de Blasio administration’s efforts to help low-income New Yorkers in other policy efforts.

“The bail bond practices are at odds with our identity as a city,” said Marton.

“At the local level, anything the city can do to address this issue, it should be doing,” added Erin George, an Advocacy Coordinator with Just Leadership USA. “Right now, this industry is pretty much unregulated. Hopefully this report will help spread the word about the issue.”

For more information or to view the report, go to www.brooklynbailfund.org.

Fin a las fianzas injustas

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen

“Nobody has done an industry-wide audit,” said Nick Malinowski, Civil Rights Campaign Director at VOCAL-NY.

“Nadie ha hecho una auditoría en toda la industria”, dijo Nick Malinowski, director de Campaña de Derechos Civiles en VOCAL-NY.

Cernirse sobre las empresas de fianzas.

Defensores están dando un empujón para asegurarse de que los neoyorquinos atrapados en el sistema de justicia penal no estén siendo desplumados por compañías de fianzas comerciales.

“Cerca de 45,000 neoyorquinos presuntamente inocentes serán encarcelados este año por su incapacidad para pagar la fianza”, dijo Peter Goldberg, director ejecutivo del Fondo de Fianzas de la Comunidad de Brooklyn, una organización que paga anualmente fianzas a más de 1,500 individuos de bajos ingresos en Brooklyn, Manhattan y Staten Island.

“Todos los días vemos los efectos nocivos y a los actores comerciales que se benefician de ello, ya que la gente acude a las compañías de fianzas a menos que quieran seguir peleando su caso desde una celda en la cárcel”, dijo Goldberg.

En una conferencia de prensa en el Ayuntamiento el 14 de junio, el Fondo de Fianzas de la Comunidad de Brooklyn publicó un nuevo informe que detalla a las compañías de fianzas comerciales en la Ciudad de Nueva York que operan violando las leyes y regulaciones estatales. También destaca la aparente falta de supervisión en la industria, que los defensores dicen que provoca que muchos grupos de fianza se aprovechen de los consumidores cuyos seres queridos enfrentan penas de prisión.

“Cada año, esta industria privatizada con fines de lucro se enriquece explotando a los consumidores cuando están más vulnerables”, dijo Nick Malinowski, director de Campaña de Derechos Civiles de VOCAL-NY, uno de los grupos de defensa que ayudaron a anunciar el informe.

Attendees said there was little transparency.

Los asistentes dijeron que hay poca transparencia.

“Nadie ha hecho una auditoría en toda la industria ni podría decirnos quiénes son los mayores actores de la industria”, dijo.

De acuerdo con el informe, muchos fiadores operan sin licencias estatales, y no cumplen con las obligaciones de información requeridas por el estado.

“Hopefully, this report will help spread the word about the issue,” said Advocacy Coordinator Erin George.

“Esperemos que este informe ayude a correr la voz sobre el tema”, dijo la coordinador de Defensa Erin George.

“Hay una completa falta de transparencia”, dijo Goldberg. “El nombre de una compañía de fianzas afuera de su tienda será diferente al nombre de su compañía si los llama”.

“Las prácticas ilegales y engañosas de los fiadores, junto con la falta de auditorías periódicas por parte de cualquier agencia estatal, significa que realmente ni siquiera sabemos qué empresas están operando ahora mismo en la ciudad de Nueva York “, agregó.

Los abogados pidieron a los reguladores estatales y de la ciudad -especialmente al gobernador Andrew Cuomo, al fiscal general Eric Schneiderman, al Departamento de Servicios Financieros del Estado de Nueva York (DFS, por sus siglas en inglés) y al Departamento de Asuntos del Consumidor de la ciudad- crear supervisión y mejorar la regulación de la industria de fianzas comerciales.

“Esta es una industria que por su propia naturaleza es depredadora y perjudicial”, comentó Goldberg.

Nasoan Sheftel-Gomes, abogada supervisora del Proyecto de Desarrollo Comunitario en el Centro de Justicia Urbana, dijo que las prácticas de la industria de fianzas representan “el fraude clásico del consumidor que opera dentro del sistema de justicia penal”.

Dijo que muchas compañías de fianzas cobran comisiones ilegales, no devuelven sus garantías y crean retrasos intencionales para sacar a las personas de la cárcel bajo fianza.

“Los préstamos predatorios de libertad bajo fianza se dirigen a comunidades de bajos ingresos de color y drenan estas comunidades necesitadas de dinero”, dijo Sheftel-Gomes. “Los neoyorquinos que están pagando a fiadores  lo hacen en lugar de pagar el alquiler o los servicios públicos”.

Malinowski dijo que los grupos de defensa se han reunido con los reguladores municipales y estatales en los últimos dos años para explicar los problemas que enfrenta la industria.

“Hemos visto más conversaciones sobre cómo la fianza en efectivo y las fianzas comerciales afectan negativamente a la gente, pero no hemos visto ningún ímpetu en cuanto a que la gente de un paso adelante para hacer algo al respecto”, comentó.

“The bail bond practices are at odds with our identity as a city,” said Policy Director Janos Marton.

“Las prácticas de fianzas están en desacuerdo con nuestra identidad como ciudad”, dijo el director de Política Janos Marton.

“Sabemos que la supervisión significativa funciona, porque hemos visto que tiene éxito en otras industrias”, dijo Sheftel-Gomes, señalando que los negocios de cobro de deudas, una vez golpeados por prácticas deshonestas, fueron controlados por los esfuerzos de DFS, el fiscal general y DCA.

Los defensores comentaron que la práctica de la fianza en efectivo también necesita ser eliminada, ya que castiga injustamente a los neoyorquinos pobres.

“Si quieren cerrar a Rikers, tienen que deshacerse de la fianza en efectivo”, dijo Goldberg.

“La fianza en efectivo castiga y aprisiona a la gente simplemente porque es pobre”, comentó. “Casi el 80 por ciento de la gente en Rikers son presuntamente inocentes y están sentados ahí simplemente porque no pueden comprar su propia libertad”.

Janos Marton, director de Política de Just Leadership USA, dijo que la ciudad debe apoyar la regulación de la industria de fianzas basándose en los esfuerzos del gobierno de De Blasio para ayudar a los neoyorquinos de bajos ingresos en otros esfuerzos políticos.

“Las prácticas de fianzas están en desacuerdo con nuestra identidad como ciudad”, dijo Marton.

“A nivel local, cualquier cosa que la ciudad pueda hacer para abordar este asunto, debería estarse haciendo”, agregó Erin George, coordinadora de Defensa de Just Leadership USA. “En este momento, esta industria está bastante desregulada. Esperemos que este informe ayude a correr la voz sobre el tema “.

Para obtener más información o para ver el informe, vaya a www.brooklynbailfund.org.