“Be willing to lose”
“Estén dispuestos a perder”

  • English
  • Español

“Be willing to lose”

Junot Díaz talks shop uptown

Story by Desiree Johnson and Gregg McQueen 

Photos by Desiree Johnson and Gregg McQueen

“We wanted to do something different,” said HSMC Theater Director Zulaika Velázquez.

“We wanted to do something
different,” said HSMC Theater
Director Zulaika Velázquez.

When Junot Díaz first shared with some closest to him that he wanted to be a writer, they were not exactly encouraging.

“They laughed,” he recalled. “I definitely didn’t [become a writer] for my family’s approval.”

The Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Drown, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, and This Is How You Lose Her, among other works, visited the George Washington Educational Campus on January 29 for an intimate chat with students.

The visit was part of a recurring lecture series hosted by the campus’ High School of Media and Communications (HSMC).

“I came from a family that wanted me to find a good job that won some pocket change,” said Díaz, a statement that drew near-instant murmurs of understanding from the two dozen students.

“I was young when I started using art as my sort of haven,” he said. “Eventually you find out if you love it or not because you keep doing it.”

Díaz said it took him a while to build a wider audience.

“At first, nobody paid attention except for Dominicans and writing nerds,” said Díaz, who switched between English and Spanish in his remarks.

“I was young when I started using art as my sort of haven,” said author Junot Díaz.

“I was young when I started
using art as my sort of haven,”
said author Junot Díaz.

He challenged students to take risks, as any pursuits, especially those of an artistic nature, include likely disappointments.

“You’ve got to have a tolerance for failure,” Díaz remarked. “You’ve got to be willing to lose, otherwise you can’t play the game. That’s how you learn.”

Though the audience consisted mostly of HSMC drama students, the lecture series also included participants from outside the school for the first time.

“We wanted to do something different, and open it up to different ages, to show the wide impact that Díaz has,” said HSMC Theater Director Zulaika Velázquez, who helped create the lecture series.

A group of students from Columbia University were among those who came to listen to Díaz.

Columbia senior Ricardo Suniga said Díaz’s advice on facing fears resonated with him. Born and raised in Mexico, Suniga remarked that his status as an immigrant has at times made him reluctant to assert himself.

“It’s at the core of your fears at times, for people of color, that you don’t belong in a certain place,” he said. “Sometimes you won’t want to apply or reach for things because you fear you won’t succeed.”

“I wanted to learn about his process,” said musician and song-writer Oten Iban.

“I wanted to learn about his
process,” said musician and
song-writer Oten Iban.

“When Junot said that we should take risks and not be afraid to fail, that really stood out to me,” Suniga added.

Alex Florian, a member of HSMC’s drama club, said that Díaz’s work guided his decision to pursue art, specifically animation.

“[Díaz’s] love for writing makes me think about how much I love what I do,” said Florian. “As long as I can do what I love, I’m happy.”

“Appearances are valued more than the truth in our culture,” added Díaz. “We want people to like us, but do you want people to like you, or do you want people to understand you?”

Michelle Romero, who is a part of the HSMC’s production in A Streetcar Named Desire, said she appreciated his perspective.

“I take the same attitude,” said Romero. “There will always be someone better than you, but you have to put in the effort.”

A writer of short stories and theater pieces, Julia Muhsen, who is part Latino and part Muslim, said Díaz’s writing led her to include more diverse characters in her work.

Muhsen said her senior thesis at Columbia was based on the works of Díaz and examined Latino culture within literature.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning author shared insights with students.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning author shared insights with students.

“It really made me find my voice, and think about what it means to be Latino and Muslim today,” she said. “I read Díaz and said, ‘I can do this,’ and assert my own voice.”

Columbia senior Ricardo Suniga said the author’s remarks resonated for him.

Columbia senior Ricardo
Suniga said the author’s
remarks resonated for him.

Musician and song-writer Oten Iban had arrived prepared with questions and took notes avidly.

“As an artist, I wanted to learn about his process, about the art of storytelling [and] truth-telling, and the art of bringing light to different issues that black and brown people face,” explained the Columbia student.

Díaz also discussed his new book – a children’s picture book titled Islandborn. It is illustrated by Leo Espinosa and has been published in English and Spanish. The story, set in Washington Heights, focuses on a young girl named Lola, who immigrates from the Dominican Republic and is unable to conjure images of the island she left as a baby.

“For me, it’s about that generation of immigrants who came over too young to remember, and a way a community creates intergenerational love,” Díaz said.

He also mentioned another project, though demurred from being more specific — “I’m writing for a TV show for a channel,” he offered.

Díaz admitted that he was a disinterested student himself who struggled in school. Yet he was drawn to writing, and found a lifeline in a few key individuals.

“There were teachers who made all the difference, and librarians who made all the difference,” he said. “You only need one good teacher to save your future.”

For more, please visit www.junotdiaz.com.

 

“Estén dispuestos a perder”

Historia por Desiree Johnson y Gregg McQueen 

Fotos por Desiree Johnson y Gregg McQueen

Romy García also attended the lecture.

Romy García también
asistió a la conferencia.

Cuando Junot Díaz compartió por primera vez con alguien cercano a él la noticia de que quería ser escritor, no fue exactamente alentadores.

“Se rieron”, recordó. “Definitivamente no me convertí en escritor para la aprobación de mi familia”.

El autor, ganador del Premio Pulitzer, de Drown, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, y This Is How You Lose Her, entre otras obras, visitó el Campus Educativo George Washington el 29 de enero para una conversación íntima con estudiantes.

La visita fue parte de una serie de conferencias recurrentes organizada por la escuela secundaria de Medios y Comunicaciones (HSMC, por sus siglas en inglés) del campus.

“Vengo de una familia que quería que encontrara un buen trabajo que ganara dinero “, dijo Díaz, una declaración que obtuvo respuestas casi instantáneas de comprensión de las dos docenas de estudiantes.

“Era joven cuando empecé a usar el arte como mi refugio”, dijo acerca de su relación con la elección de su carrera. “Eventualmente descubres si te gusta o no porque sigues haciéndolo”.

From left, participating students: Ana Made, Alex Florian, Michelle Romero, and Dylan Núñez.

De izquierda a derecha, estudiantes participantes: Ana Made, Alex Florian, Michelle Romero y Dylan Núñez.

Díaz dijo que le tomó un tiempo construir una audiencia más amplia.

“Al principio, nadie prestó atención, excepto los dominicanos y los nerds escritores”, dijo Díaz, quien intercambió entre inglés y español en sus comentarios para acomodarse a los distintos niveles de fluidez de los estudiantes.

Díaz’s new book.

El nuevo libro de Díaz.

Desafió a los estudiantes a tomar riesgos, ya que cualquier actividad, especialmente una de naturaleza artística, incluye algunas decepciones.

“Tienes que tener tolerancia al fracaso”, remarcó Díaz. “Tienes que estar dispuesto a perder, de lo contrario no puedes jugar el juego. Así es como aprendes “.

Aunque la audiencia consistió principalmente de estudiantes de drama de HSMC, la serie de conferencias también incluyó a participantes de fuera de la escuela por primera vez.

“Queríamos hacer algo diferente y abrirlo a diferentes edades para mostrar el gran impacto que Díaz tiene”, dijo Zulaika Velázquez, directora de teatro de HSMC, quien ayudó a crear la serie de conferencias.

Un grupo de estudiantes de la Universidad Columbia estuvo entre los que vinieron a escuchar a Díaz.

Ricardo Suniga, estudiante de último año de Columbia, dijo que el consejo de Díaz sobre enfrentar los temores resonó en él. Nacido y criado en México, Suniga comentó que su condición de inmigrante a veces lo ha hecho reacio a afirmarse.

Danny Minaya is a senior at the High School of Media and Communications (HSMC).

Danny Minaya es estudiante de
último año en la Preparatoria de
Medios y Comunicaciones
(HSMC, por sus siglas en inglés).

“En ocasiones, para la gente de color, está en el centro de tus miedos el no pertenecer a un lugar determinado”, dijo. “A veces no querrás postularte o buscar algo porque temes no tener éxito”.

“Cuando Junot dijo que deberíamos arriesgarnos y no tener miedo a fracasar, eso realmente me llamó la atención”, agregó Suniga.

Alex Florian, miembro del club de drama de HSMC, dijo que el trabajo de Díaz guio su decisión de dedicarse al arte, específicamente a la animación.

“El amor [de Díaz] por escribir me hace pensar en lo mucho que amo lo que hago”, dijo Florian. “Mientras pueda hacer lo que amo, soy feliz”.

“Las apariencias se valoran más que la verdad en nuestra cultura”, agregó Díaz. “Queremos gustar a las personas, pero ¿quieres gustarle a la gente o quieres que la gente te entienda?”.

Michelle Romero, quien es parte de la producción de HSMC en A Streetcar Named Desire, dijo apreciar su perspectiva.

“Tomo la misma actitud”, dijo Romero. “Siempre habrá alguien mejor que tú, pero debes esforzarte”.

Una escritora de cuentos y piezas de teatro, Julia Muhsen, que es en parte latina y en parte musulmana, dijo que la escritura de Díaz la llevó a incluir personajes más diversos en su trabajo.

“You’ve got to be willing to lose,” said Díaz.

“Deben estar dispuestos a perder”, dijo Díaz.

Muhsen dijo que su tesis de último año en Columbia se basó en los trabajos de Díaz y examinó la cultura latina dentro de la literatura.

“Realmente me hizo encontrar mi voz y pensar en lo que significa ser latina y musulmana hoy”, dijo. “Leí a Díaz y dije: puedo hacer esto y afirmar mi propia voz”.

Julia Muhsen said Díaz’s writing led her to include more diverse characters in her work.

Julia Muhsen dijo que la
escritura de Díaz la llevó a
incluir personajes más
diversos en su obra.

El músico y compositor Oten Iban llegó preparado con preguntas y tomó notas con avidez.

“Como artista, quería aprender sobre su proceso, sobre el arte de contar historias [y] contar la verdad, y el arte de dar a conocer los diferentes problemas que enfrentan las personas negras y marrones”, explicó el estudiante de Columbia.

Díaz también discutió su próximo libro infantil Islandborn. La historia, ambientada en Washington Heights, se centra en una joven llamada Lola, que se mudó de la República Dominicana y no puede conjurar imágenes de la isla que dejó cuando era bebé.

“Para mí, se trata de la generación de inmigrantes que llegó demasiado joven para recordar, y una forma en que una comunidad crea el amor intergeneracional”, dijo Díaz.

También mencionó otro proyecto, aunque no fue específico: “Estoy escribiendo para un programa de TV de un canal”, ofreció.

Díaz admitió que él mismo fue un estudiante desinteresado que tuvo problemas en la escuela. Sin embargo, se sintió atraído por la escritura, dijo, y encontró un salvavidas en algunas personas clave.

“Hubo profesores que hicieron toda la diferencia, y bibliotecarios que marcaron la diferencia”, afirmó. “Solo necesitas un buen maestro para salvar tu futuro”.

Para obtener más información, visite www.junotdiaz.com.