A hero makes his rounds
Un héroe hace sus rondas

  • English
  • Español

A hero makes his rounds

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

“We had to drive through the water to get to those people,” recalled Sergeant Onix Lugo, USPS Manager of Baychester Post Office, of his rescue efforts during Hurricane Sandy.

“We had to drive through the water to get to those people,” recalled Sergeant Onix Lugo, USPS Manager of Baychester Post Office, of his rescue efforts during Hurricane Sandy.

“Neither rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these carriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.”

So read the words carved in the granite structure of the James A. Farley Main Post Office of the United States Postal Service (USPS) at 421 Eighth Avenue.

Sergeant Onix Lugo, USPS Baychester Manager, is just one of many who endures the heat and gloom of night.

He joined the USPS in 1994, and his first job was as a letter carrier in Bowling Green. He was transferred to Inwood in 1998, the same year he joined the Army National Guard.

“It was a culture shock,” he said of his transfer.

In those years, he would find drugs stashed in the mailboxes. Drug dealers would post guards at these boxes, and Lugo quickly learned which buildings to avoid.

Once, a resident tried to bribe him into unlocking someone else’s mailbox, and another time he found himself in the middle of a domestic dispute between a drug dealer and his young wife.

“She was screaming, ‘Let me go! Let me go!’”

The man had been beating her, and Lugo stumbled into the situation doing his mail rounds. He stepped in between the two and threatened to call the police on the man, who eventually gave up pursuit.

“We got hit so bad; we were barely able to make it back to the base,” said Sgt. Lugo of his service in Baghdad.

“We got hit so bad; we were barely able to make it back to the base,” said Sgt. Lugo of his service in Baghdad.

But navigating the streets of Inwood was nothing compared to what he would encounter in subsequent years as a soldier in the Middle East, and more recently as an Army National Guardsman during Hurricane Sandy in the past year.

Lugo was honored for his efforts on Mon., Nov. 4th during a ceremony honoring veterans within the USPS. Lugo received the New York State Meritorious Award, the state’s third highest award from Governor Andrew Cuomo for his rescue efforts during Hurricane Sandy, in which he saved 500 civilians and many pets.

The ceremony was held in the new Veterans Hall of Honor on the 33rd Street rotunda.

“The James A. Farley Main Post Office Veterans Hall preserves the legacy of brave Americans, and upholds the founding principles that have built this great nation.  Our veterans’ unwavering devotion inspires us all. They are the best of America”, said USPS District Manager William Schnaars.

Sergeant Onix Lugo helped rescue over 500 people and pets on Staten Island.  Photo: Courtesy of O. Lugo

Sergeant Onix Lugo helped rescue over 500 people and pets on Staten Island.
Photo: Courtesy of O. Lugo

In the early morning hours of Mon., Oct. 29th, 2012, the National Guard called Lugo and seven others to rescue people who had been trapped in a school, and many others who were stuck in their flooded homes.

While the rest of New York City was trying to stay high and dry, Lugo and the National Guards headed out to Staten Island, which had been besieged by the rising waters of New York Harbor. He spent 109 consecutive hours there.

The National Guard arrived in two military cargo trucks capable of transporting five tons of cargo, but soon realized that boats would have been more effective. However, there was no time to wait, and Lugo resolved to go forward in the trucks.

“We had to drive through the water to get to those people.”

Time was not on his side—in the morning, storm surges would reach 15 feet.

As Lugo and his partner made their way in the truck, the water reached the vehicle’s headlights, which he estimates are five feet off the ground, and was already seeping into the truck’s cabin. They were unable to drive more than 10 miles an hour, and their progress was also hindered by floating cars and felled trees they had to dodge.

He recalled that his partner asked him, “Are we going to make it?”

“They are the best of America,” said USPS District Manager William Schnaars of veteran workers.

“They are the best of America,” said USPS District Manager William Schnaars of veteran workers.

“I said, ‘Yes, I’ve done this hundreds of times.’”

But Lugo was bluffing in an attempt to keep anxiety low.

“There was very little time to think about it. I was dirty and tired, but we had to get those people out. I took everyone, their pets, their belongings and I went back for more. We kept going and going until they told us they didn’t need us.”

Before he was relieved, Lugo would spend four days on rescue missions, extracting people and pets from houses that would soon be flooded by the surge.

“Those pets were heavy, especially when they’re wet,” he noted, “We rescued from Yorkies to Rottweilers. And a cat, too.”

There were other unexpected turns.

“We were coming down Highland Avenue, and a lady flags me down, and she tells me her daughter in law is pregnant and having contractions.”

Lugo quickly loaded the pregnant woman and her husband into the truck, and got acquainted with them.

“The woman tells me her name is Mary. And the husband laughs, and I asked, ‘Why are you laughing?’ And he said, ‘My name is Joseph, and our baby is due on the 25th of December.’”

To everyone’s relief, the woman was having back pains, and not premature labor.

Sgt. Lugo and his team spent 109 consecutive hours in Staten Island.  Photo: Courtesy of O. Lugo

Sgt. Lugo and his team spent 109 consecutive hours in Staten Island.
Photo: Courtesy of O. Lugo

Lugo’s aquatic experience in Staten Island contrasts sharply with the desert terrain of his days in Iraq and Afghanistan.

While in Afghanistan in 2010 and 2011, Lugo patrolled the country’s border with Pakistan.

In Iraq, Lugo was made team leader of a nine-man convoy, seeing to it that essential supplies made it from the south of the country to Baghdad in the north.

“I promised I’d bring them home, and I did.”

It was not an easy promise to keep.

On a good day, the trip was four hours. But good days were hard to come by.

On Lugo’s first trip to Baghdad in 2004, the convoy was met with improvised explosive devices (IED’s) planted on the roadside. After the convoy was stopped because an IED was detonated, insurgents opened fire.

“We got hit so bad; we were barely able to make it back to the base.”

Finally, in 2005, Lugo and his team returned home.

But even before his tours of duty in the Middle East, an event closer to home is what first challenged his ability to cope with disaster – the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11th.

“It was something I did not expect to happen in my backyard. It prepared me for everything else,” he said. “I choked up when I saw what I saw.”

It looked like a war zone, he recalled.

In addition to this Meritorious Award, Lugo has earned 21 ribbons.

Five are recognitions of his service in New York; the rest are for his military services.

It is not, he insisted, what drives him.

“I don’t do it for the ribbons on my chest,” he said.

“My daughter asked me why I do these things and put myself in these situations,” he recalled. “I guess it’s something the higher being wants me to do.”

Un héroe hace sus rondas

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

“We had to drive through the water to get to those people,” recalled Sergeant Onix Lugo, USPS Manager of Baychester Post Office, of his rescue efforts during Hurricane Sandy.

“Tuvimos que conducir a través del agua para llegar a esas personas”, recordó el sargento Onix Lugo, gerente de la oficina de correos USPS de Baychester, sobre sus esfuerzos de rescate durante el huracán Sandy.

“Ni la lluvia, ni el calor ni la oscuridad de la noche alejan a estos portadores de la rápida conclusión de sus rondas acordadas”.

Así se leen las palabras talladas en la estructura de granito de la oficina principal de correos James A. Farley del Servicio Postal de los Estados Unidos (USPS) en el 421 de la Octava avenida.

El sargento Onix Lugo, Gerente de USPS Baychester, es sólo uno de los muchos que soportan el calor y la oscuridad de la noche.

Se unió a USPS en 1994, y su primer trabajo fue como cartero en Bowling Green. Fue trasladado a Inwood en 1998, el mismo año que se unió a la Guardia Nacional del Ejército.

“Fue un choque cultural”, dijo de su transferencia.

En aquellos años, encontraba drogas escondidas en los buzones. Los traficantes de drogas hacían guardias en esos buzones y Lugo aprendió rápidamente qué edificios evitar.

Una vez, un residente trató de sobornarlo para abrir el buzón de otra persona, y en otra ocasión se encontró en medio de una disputa doméstica entre un traficante de drogas y su joven esposa.

“Ella gritaba: ‘¡Suéltame! ¡Déjame ir!'”.

El hombre la estaba golpeando y Lugo se encontró con la situación haciendo sus rondas habituales. Él se interpuso entre los dos y amenazó con denunciar al hombre con la policía, quien finalmente abandonó su actividad.

Sergeant Onix Lugo helped rescue over 500 people and pets on Staten Island.  Photo: Courtesy of O. Lugo

El sargento Onix Lugo ayudó a rescatar a más de 500 personas y mascotas en Staten Island.
Foto: Cortesía de O. Lugo

Pero navegar por las calles de Inwood no era nada comparado con lo que se encontraría en los años siguientes como soldado en el Medio Oriente, y más recientemente como miembro de la Guardia Nacional del Ejército durante el huracán Sandy el año pasado.

Lugo fue honrado por sus esfuerzos el lunes 4 de noviembre durante una ceremonia en honor a los veteranos en el USPS. Lugo recibió el Premio Meritorio del estado de Nueva York, el tercer premio más importante del estado, de manos del gobernador Andrew Cuomo por sus esfuerzos de rescate durante el huracán Sandy, en el que salvó a 500 civiles y muchos animales domésticos.

La ceremonia se realizó en el nuevo Salón de Honor Veteranos en la rotonda de la calle 33.

“El Salón Veteranos de la oficina de principal de correos James A. Farley, preserva el legado de los estadounidenses valientes y defiende los principios fundamentales que han construido esta gran nación. La inquebrantable devoción de nuestros veteranos nos inspira a todos. Son los mejores de América”, dijo el Gerente Distrital de USPS William Schnaars.

En las primeras horas de la mañana del lunes 29 de octubre de 2012, la Guardia Nacional llamó a Lugo y otros siete para rescatar a personas que habían quedado atrapadas en una escuela, y muchos otros que estaban atrapados en sus casas inundadas.

Mientras que el resto de la ciudad de Nueva York trataba de mantenerse segura, Lugo y los guardias nacionales se dirigieron a Staten Island, que fue sitiada por las crecientes aguas de la bahía de Nueva York. Él pasó 109 horas consecutivas allí.

“We got hit so bad; we were barely able to make it back to the base,” said Sgt. Lugo of his service in Baghdad.

“Nos pegó tan duro que apenas fuimos capaces de regresar a la base”, dijo el sargento. Lugo, de su servicio en Bagdad.

La Guardia Nacional llegó en dos camiones militares de carga con capacidad para transportar cinco toneladas, pero pronto se dio cuenta de que los barcos hubieran sido más efectivos. Sin embargo, no había tiempo para esperar, y decidió avanzar con los camiones.

“Tuvimos que conducir a través del agua para llegar a esas personas”.

El tiempo no estuvo de su lado, en la mañana, el oleaje de la tormenta podía alcanzar los 15 pies.

Mientras Lugo y su compañero se dirigían a la camioneta, el agua alcanzó los faros del vehículo, que según sus cálculos estaban a cinco pies del suelo, y empezó a filtrarse a la cabina del camión. No fueron capaces de conducir a más de 10 millas por hora y su progreso también se vio obstaculizado por los coches que flotaban y los árboles caídos que tenían que esquivar.

Recordó que su compañero le preguntó: “¿Vamos a lograrlo?”.

“Le dije: ‘Sí, lo he hecho cientos de veces’”.

Pero Lugo, estaba mintiendo en un intento de mantener la ansiedad al mínimo.

“Había muy poco tiempo para pensar en ello. Estaba sucio y cansado, pero teníamos que sacar a esa gente. Tomé a todas las personas, sus mascotas, sus pertenencias y me fui por más. Seguimos avanzando y avanzando hasta que nos dijeron que no nos necesitaban”.

“They are the best of America,” said USPS District Manager William Schnaars of veteran workers.

“Son lo mejor de América”​​, dijo el gerente distrital de USPS, William Schnaars, de los trabajadores veteranos.

Antes de ser relevado, Lugo pasó cuatro días en misiones de rescate, extrayendo personas y animales domésticos de las casas que luego fueron inundadas por el oleaje.

“Esos animales son pesados​​, especialmente cuando están mojados”, señaló, “Nosotros rescatamos desde Yorkies hasta Rottweilers. Y a un gato, también”.

Hubo otros giros inesperados.

“Veníamos sobre la avenida Highland cuando una señora nos hizo señas y dijo que su nuera estaba embarazada y tenía contracciones”.

Lugo llevó rápidamente a la mujer embarazada y a su marido al camión, y se familiarizó con ellos.

“La mujer me dijo que su nombre era María. El marido se rió, y yo pregunté: ¿Por qué te ríes? Y él dijo: mi nombre es José y nuestro bebé nacerá el 25 de diciembre”.

Para alivio de todos, la mujer estaba teniendo dolores de espalda, y no trabajo de parto prematuro.

La experiencia acuática de Lugo en Staten Island contrasta con el terreno desértico de sus días en Irak y Afganistán.

Estando en Afganistán en 2010 y 2011, Lugo patrulló la frontera del país con Pakistán.

En Irak, Lugo se hizo líder del equipo de un convoy de nueve hombres, procurando que los suministros esenciales llegaran desde el sur del país, a Bagdad, en el norte.

“Les prometí que los llevaría de regreso a casa, y lo hice”.

Sgt. Lugo and his team spent 109 consecutive hours in Staten Island.  Photo: Courtesy of O. Lugo

El sargento Lugo y su equipo pasaron 109 horas consecutivas en Staten Island.
Foto: Cortesía de O. Lugo

No era una promesa fácil de cumplir.

En un buen día, el viaje era de cuatro horas. Pero los buenos días eran difíciles de conseguir.

En el primer viaje de Lugo a Bagdad en 2004, el convoy fue recibido con artefactos explosivos improvisados ​​(IEDs por sus siglas en inglés) plantados en la carretera. Después de que el convoy se detuvo debido a que un IED fue detonado, los insurgentes abrieron fuego.

“Nos pegó tan duro que apenas fuimos capaces de regresar a la base.”

Finalmente, en 2005, Lugo y su equipo regresaron a casa.

Pero incluso antes de sus períodos de servicio en Oriente Medio, un evento cerca de casa fue el primer desafió a su capacidad para hacer frente al desastre: los ataques terroristas del 11 de septiembre.

“Fue algo que no esperaba que sucediera en mi patio trasero. Esto me preparó para todo lo demás”, dijo. “Me quedé sin palabras cuando vi lo que vi”.

Parecía una zona de guerra, recordó.

Además de este Premio Meritorio, Lugo ha ganado 21 cintas.

Cinco son reconocimientos de su servicio en Nueva York, el resto son por sus servicios militares.

No se trata, insistió, de lo que lo impulsa.

“No lo hago por las cintas en mi pecho”, dijo.

“Mi hija me pregunta por qué hago estas cosas y me pongo en estas situaciones”, recordó. “Supongo que es algo que el ser superior quiere que haga”.