A conference of queens
Una encuentro de reinas

  • English
  • Español

A conference of queens

Story by Madeleine Cummings and Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

The non-profit group 100 Hispanic Women hosted the 12th Annual Mind, Body, and Spirit Conference.  Photo: R. Kilmer

The non-profit group 100 Hispanic Women hosted the 12th Annual Mind, Body, and Spirit Conference.
Photo: R. Kilmer

Over 250 women spent the day at Yankee Stadium this past Wed., Mar. 5th discussing issues such as domestic violence, barriers to self-empowerment, and toxic relationships.

Hosted by the non-profit group 100 Hispanic Women, the 12th Annual Mind, Body, and Spirit Conference set out to explore how mental, physical, and spiritual health can combine, empowering women to live healthy and fulfilling lives.

Milagros Báez O’Toole, 100 Hispanic Women’s President, said that by addressing women’s health issues, the conference contributes to the organization’s overall mission of promoting women’s educational and professional development.

“Our goal is to find ways of pushing women to become educated and pushing them into high-level leadership positions,” she said.

Though O’Toole made a successful career for herself in public service, serving in various capacities in a series of city agencies and at the NYS Office of General Services, she said many women – and Hispanic women in particular – have not necessarily been trained to think of themselves as leaders in the work force.

100 Hispanic Women President Milagros Baez O’Toole spoke on the significance of leadership.  Photo: M. Cummings

100 Hispanic Women President Milagros Baez O’Toole spoke on the significance of leadership.
Photo: M. Cummings

“We weren’t always geared to that mindset,” she said.

The conference featured a panel on domestic violence, workshops on self-empowerment, musical performances, and stress-management activities such as massage therapy, yoga, and journaling.

Robert Sancho, Vice President of Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center – the event’s main sponsor – emphasized the importance of stress management techniques in preventing many women’s health problems.

He also spoke reverently about 100 Hispanic Women, whose founders he knows well.

“They were all really strong women who conquered difficult obstacles – things like going to college, coming from single-parent households, and their families were very poor. They managed to get leadership positions in both private and public industry,” said Sancho. “They were not women that left and forgot and rested on their laurels. They’re giving back to the community.”

In one workshop, psychologist Luis Laviena and Wendy Oliveras teamed up to offer strategies for identifying and getting out of toxic relationships. Laviena said that these relationships, in which one partner dominates or disrespects the other, often eat away at women’s self-esteem. Women who find themselves involved in them, he said, should analyze their behavior, make an action plan for change, and not be afraid of seeking help.

A music and movement workshop.  Photo: M. Cummings

A music and movement workshop.
Photo: M. Cummings

Oliveras took a slightly different approach to the issue. A lifelong chess player and author of Let’s Play SHESS, a book about how the game can cultivate female empowerment, she explained that skills such as critical thinking and pattern recognition can also be used by women struggling with toxic relationships. She is also founder and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Oliveras and Company, a legal search firm specializing in the recruitment of intellectual property attorneys and partners.

But on Thursday she was all about shess.

Shess, she explained, is a way women can look to use the game to think strategically strategic and problem solve. People start as pawns—the least powerful piece that can only move forward one square at a time, to a queen, the most powerful player, that can move in any direction, as far as the length of the entire board.

Participant Enid Torres and daughter Tiana.  Photo: M. Cummings

Participant Enid Torres and daughter Tiana.
Photo: M. Cummings

“In your game of life, you’re born as a pawn. As a female, you’re the only one who can promote yourself,” she said to the group of women who circled around to listen to her presentation.

“The most powerful opponent in your game of life is yourself,” she told them. You decide if you’ll go from being a pawn, to being a queen.”

“I found her topic very relevant,” said Teresita Krueger, a partner at Latin Business Today. “She really brought it to very simple terms: you need to understand your problem, you need to effectively approach it, and you need to know how to challenge yourself.”

According to Oliveras, women shy away from playing chess because it’s perceived as too intellectual.

“But that’s old-fashioned thinking!” she said.

“We’re in the 21st century and we need to empower ourselves through every possible avenue we can. We need to be confident and believe in ourselves and chess is a wonderful way to do that.”

Nearby, Gloria Rodríguez, a professor of psychology at BronxCommunity College, and author of You Are More than Good Enough, offered a workshop on how to reach human and spiritual potential.

Among other things, Rodríguez encouraged forgiveness as a form of moving on.

Non-stop networking.  Photo: M. Cummings

Non-stop networking.
Photo: M. Cummings

“All forgiveness is self forgiveness,” she said to the group, who jotted down notes avidly.

“Resentment is like taking poison and expecting the other person to die,” she said.

Rodríguez also recommended three things for women to do every day to help improve their lives.

“A woman should trust her heart, affirm her sacredness, and be love in the world.”

Enid Torres, a nursing student at BronxCommunity College who attended the conference with her eldest daughter, Tiana, said she was inspired by Rodríguez’s words and convinced of journaling’s power as a tool for self-reflection.

Though she loved the day’s workshops, she said she would like to see more opportunities for younger Hispanic women to learn similar skills.

“Our goal is to find ways of pushing women into high-level leadership positions,” said President O’Toole.  Photo: M. Cummings

“Our goal is to find ways of pushing women into high-level leadership positions,” said President O’Toole.
Photo: M. Cummings

“Unfortunately, there aren’t a lot of [workshops] that occur outside of organizations like this,” she said. Successful women, in her view, should go into high schools and colleges and start more peer mentoring and team building programs.

100 Hispanic Women does offer several opportunities for students. There is a scholarship program for Latina students enrolled in City University of New York colleges, a number of graduate fellowships, and, since 2008, an all-girls charter school in the Bronx. Students are also invited to join the organization at a steep discount – $25 instead of $250.

The conference, which ended with a Zumba session led by Hilda Rosario, also served a social purpose.

Women chatted over breakfast and lunch, exchanged business cards, and came up to O’Toole throughout the day to talk about speakers and the issues they raised.

As women around her embraced and spoke animatedly, the benefits of simply talking were not lost on O’Toole.

Smiling, she noted, “It’s also nice for women to be able to come together and just be able to relax and to see their friends.”

For more information on 100 Hispanic Women, please visit www.100hispanicwomen.org or call 347.649.3188.

Una encuentro de reinas

100 Mujeres Hispanas celebra Quinta Conferencia Anual

Historia por Madeleine Cummings y Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

Más de 250 mujeres pasaron el día en el estadio de los Yankee el pasado miércoles 5 de marzo, discutiendo temas como la violencia doméstica, las barreras al libre empoderamiento y las relaciones tóxicas.

Conducida por el grupo sin fines de lucro, 100 Mujeres Hispanas, la 12 ª Conferencia anual Mente, Cuerpo y Espíritu se propuso explorar cómo la salud mental, física y espiritual se puede combinar, empoderando a las mujeres para vivir una vida saludable y plena.

The non-profit group 100 Hispanic Women hosted the 12th Annual Mind, Body, and Spirit Conference. Photo: R. Kilmer

El grupo sin fines de lucro 100 Mujeres Hispanas patrocinó la 12ª Conferencia Anual Mente, Cuerpo y Espíritu.
Foto: R. Kilmer

Milagros Báez O’Toole, presidenta de 100 Mujeres Hispanas, dijo que al abordar los problemas de salud de las mujeres, la conferencia contribuye a la misión general de la organización de promover el desarrollo educativo y profesional de las mujeres.

“Nuestro objetivo es encontrar la manera de apoyar a las mujeres para educarse e impulsarlas hacia puestos de liderazgo de alto nivel”, dijo.

Aunque O’Toole hizo una carrera exitosa en el servicio público, sirviendo en varias capacidades en una serie de agencias de la ciudad y en la Oficina de Servicios Generales del estado de NY, dijo que muchas mujeres -y los hombres hispanos en particular- no necesariamente han sido entrenados para pensar sobre sí mismos como líderes en la fuerza de trabajo.

"Todas ellas fueron mujeres muy fuertes que conquistaron obstáculos difíciles", dijo el vicepresidente del Hospital Bronx-Lebanon, Robert Sancho, sobre las líderes del grupo. Foto: M. Cummings

“Todas ellas fueron mujeres muy fuertes que conquistaron obstáculos difíciles”, dijo el vicepresidente del Hospital Bronx-Lebanon, Robert Sancho, sobre las líderes del grupo.
Foto: M. Cummings

“No siempre fuimos orientados sobre esa forma de pensar”, dijo.

La conferencia contó con una mesa redonda sobre la violencia doméstica, talleres sobre auto-empoderamiento, actuaciones musicales y actividades de control del estrés, tales como terapia de masaje, yoga y llevar un diario.

Robert Sancho, Vicepresidente de Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center, el principal patrocinador del evento, hizo hincapié sobre la importancia de las técnicas de manejo del estrés en la prevención de muchos problemas de salud de las mujeres.

También habló con reverencia sobre 100 Mujeres Hispanas, cuyas fundadoras conoce bien.

“Todas ellas eran mujeres muy fuertes que conquistaron obstáculos difíciles, cosas como ir a la universidad, viniendo de hogares monoparentales y de familias muy pobres. Se las arreglaron para conseguir posiciones de liderazgo tanto en el sector privado como en el público”, dijo Sancho. “No fueron mujeres que dejaron la vida pasar y se quedaron descansando en sus laureles. Apoyaron a la comunidad”.

En uno de los talleres, los psicólogos Luis Laviena y Wendy Oliveras se unieron para ofrecer estrategias para identificar y salir de relaciones tóxicas. Laviena dijo que estas relaciones, en la que uno de los integrantes de la pareja domina o falta el respeto al otro, a menudo acaban con la autoestima de las mujeres. Las mujeres que se encuentran involucradas en una relación así, dijo, deben analizar su comportamiento, hacer un plan de acción para el cambio, y no tener miedo de buscar ayuda.

La jugadora de ajedrez de toda la vida y autora, Wendy Oliveras, presentó la estrategia SHESS.  Foto: M. Cummings

La jugadora de ajedrez de toda la vida y autora, Wendy Oliveras, presentó la estrategia SHESS.
Foto: M. Cummings

Oliveras tuvo un enfoque ligeramente diferente a la cuestión. Una jugadora de ajedrez de toda la vida y autora de Let’s Play SHESS, un libro sobre cómo el juego puede cultivar el empoderamiento femenino, explicó que habilidades como el pensamiento crítico y el reconocimiento de patrones también pueden ser usados por mujeres que luchan con relaciones tóxicas. También es fundadora y directora general (CEO) de Oliveras and Company, una firma de búsqueda legal especializada en la contratación de abogados y socios de propiedad intelectual.

Pero el jueves era todo sobre shess.

Shess, explicó, es una manera en que las mujeres pueden recurrir a utilizar el juego de pensar estratégicamente y resolver problemas. La gente empieza como peones, la pieza menos poderosa que sólo puede avanzar un cuadro a la vez, hasta una reina, la jugadora más poderosa, que puede moverse en cualquier dirección, tanto como la longitud de todo el tablero.

“En el juego de la vida, naces como un peón. Como mujeres, ustedes son las únicas que pueden promoverse”, le dijo al grupo de mujeres que la rodeó para escuchar su presentación.

“El más poderoso oponente en el juego de la vida es uno mismo”, les dijo. Usted decide si va a pasar de ser un peón, a ser una reina”.

“Encontré su tema muy relevante”, dijo Teresita Krueger, socia de Latin Business Today. “Ella realmente lo trajo a términos muy simples: hay que entender el problema, es necesario acercarse de manera efectiva y necesitamos saber cómo desafiarnos a nosotras mismas”.

Non-stop networking.  Photo: M. Cummings

Se establecieron redes sin parar.
Foto: M. Cummings

Según Oliveras, las mujeres huyen de jugar al ajedrez porque es percibido como demasiado intelectual.

“Pero eso es pensamiento pasado de moda”, dijo.

“Estamos en el siglo XXI y necesitamos fortalecernos a través de todas las vías posibles que podamos. Tenemos que tener confianza y creer en nosotras mismas y el ajedrez es una maravillosa manera de hacer eso”.

Cerca de allí, Gloria Rodríguez, profesora de psicología en Bronx Community College y autora de You Are More than Good Enough, ofreció un taller sobre cómo alcanzar el potencial humano y espiritual.

Entre otras cosas, Rodríguez promovió el perdón como una forma de seguir adelante.

"Muy relevante", es como la participante Teresita Krueger, socia de Latin Business Today, describió su experiencia en la conferencia. Foto: M. Cummings

“Muy relevante”, es como la participante Teresita Krueger, socia de Latin Business Today, describió su experiencia en la conferencia.
Foto: M. Cummings

“Todo el perdón es auto perdón”, le dijo al grupo, que tomó notas ávidamente.

“El resentimiento es como tomar veneno y esperar que la otra persona muera”, dijo.

Rodríguez también recomendó tres cosas para que las mujeres hagan todos los días para ayudar a mejorar sus vidas.

“Una mujer debe confiar en su corazón, afirmar su carácter sagrado y ser amor en el mundo”.

Enid Torres, estudiante de enfermería en el Bronx Community College, quien asistió a la conferencia con su hija mayor, Tiana, dijo que se inspiró en las palabras de Rodríguez y se convenció del poder de un diario como una herramienta para la auto-reflexión.

Aunque amó los talleres del día, dijo que le gustaría ver más oportunidades para las mujeres hispanas más jóvenes para aprender habilidades similares.

“Desafortunadamente, no hay una gran cantidad [de talleres] que sucedan fuera de las organizaciones de este tipo”, comentó. Las mujeres de éxito, en su opinión, deben ir a las escuelas secundarias y universidades y comenzar más programas de tutoría y formación de equipos de colegas.

100 Mujeres Hispanas sí ofrece varias oportunidades para estudiantes. Hay un programa de becas para estudiantes latinas matriculadas en las universidades de City University of New York, una serie de becas de posgrado y, desde 2008, una escuela chárter de niñas en el Bronx. Las estudiantes también están invitadas a unirse a la organización con un gran descuento, $25 dólares en lugar de $250.

Se ofreció una sesión de Zumba.  Foto: R. Kilmer

Se ofreció una sesión de Zumba.
Foto: R. Kilmer

La conferencia, que concluyó con una sesión de Zumba dirigida por Hilda Rosario, también sirvió para un propósito social.

Las mujeres charlaron durante el desayuno y el almuerzo, intercambiaron tarjetas de presentación, y se acercaron con O’Toole durante todo el día para hablar de los oradores y los temas planteados.

A medida que las mujeres alrededor la abrazaron y le hablaron animadamente, los beneficios de simplemente hablar no pasaron desapercibidos para O’Toole.

Sonriendo, señaló: “También es bueno que las mujeres sean capaces de unirse y simplemente relajarse y ver a sus amigas”.

Para mayor información sobre 100 Mujeres Hispanas, por favor visite www.100hispanicwomen.org o llame al 347.649.3188.